ACRBA – Bethlehem’s Warrior Baby by Ray Hawkins

19 – 23 November
is introducing
 

Bethlehem’s Warrior Baby (31 Day Devotional)

(Even  Before Publishing November 2012)
About the Author:
Ray Hawkins

Ray Hawkins, retired after over 40 years as a Churches of Christ minister, enjoys sharing themes from the Scriptures through Devotional writing. Married to Mary, multi-published inspirational romance author, they have three children and five grandchildren. Ray shares his insights in his first two books on Marriage and Children with more ideas to come about ministry and much more. Living in Beauty Point Tasmania Ray heads up a new Christian Fellowship as well as doing relief preaching, community work and writing.
Book Description:

Bethlehem’s Warrior Baby (31 Day Devotional)

Short Book Description: In 31 daily devotional meditations Bethlehem’s Warrior Baby takes you out of a sentimental nativity scene and into a contest with eternal significance.

It walks you through God’s promise in Genesis 3:15 of Someone coming and the clues to His identity in the old Testament. You become aware that in the
Christmas event that ‘Someone’ has come.

I believe Christmas is the culmination of Heaven’s countdown to reclaim men, women and creation from the tyranny of sin, death and Satan. The cost involved to God to achieve this should make the reader bow in awe and gratitude.
Narelle: I am a fan of Ray Hawkins’ devotion books and Bethlehem’s Warrior Baby lived up to my expectations. I really like how Ray is able to explain complex theological concepts in a way that is easy to understand.
The devotions look at how Jesus’ time on Earth fits into God’s plan of salvation for the world. We read verses in both the Old and New Testaments to help us understand why Christmas is truly a time of great celebration. Jesus’ birth is put into historical context. The prophesy and events recorded in the Old Testament pointing to Jesus’ arrival as our Lord and Saviour are explored in the devotions.
Each devotion starts with a Bible reading and concludes with a prayer. I highly recommend Bethlehem’s Warrior Baby to those looking to gain a fuller understanding of who Jesus is and the true  meaning of Christmas from a Biblical perspective. I also believe this devotion book would be useful for seekers and those wanting to learn more about Jesus and his role in God’s plan of salvation.   
I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher.

The Sovereignty of God

by Carole Towriss

In my book, In the Shadow of Sinai, Bezalel has to learn to accept God’s will in his life after several shattering blows.

Submitting to God’s plan for our life can be painful, even agonizing. I know. When we got married, my husband and I both wanted a large family. We started trying to get pregnant after he came home from a six-week trip to Vietnam for CNN. At that point we’d been married almost two years. He traveled quite a bit, so we tried for two years instead of the standard one before we saw a doctor. We spent six more years swallowing pills and getting shots. I prayed and cried, and cried and prayed. I hated Mother’s Day. I was terrified of spending the rest of my life without a child. I’d see pregnant teenagers clearly not ready for motherhood, and abandoned babies, and abused children, and wonder why our prayers remained unanswered.

A few months ago a faithful Haitian man in our church died after a long battle with cancer. He’d dedicated his life to evangelizing the Haitian people in Washington, DC. He pastored the Creole-speaking church his father started, distributed Bibles, even resigned a lucrative job to drive a taxi to more actively share the Gospel. His widow is having a difficult time understanding why God would call home such a hard-working and effective servant. Last month she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Stories like these don’t seem fair.

Sometimes, in time, we can see a reason for God’s actions.

We eventually had one bio child, and adopted three more babies from Kazakhstan. We have a crazy, wacky set of four kids that share no DNA and very few traits, but make for a chaotic, fun, and love-filled house. Had we not brought them to our home, they most likely would never have heard the Name of Jesus. Perhaps one day one will take it back there, and be able to share it as only native-born people can. Maybe not. Only God knows.

Sometimes we never see His plan.

My mother-in-law died shortly after we were married. I adored her. She was forever buying Bibles and giving them away. A couple weeks after the funeral we received a call from the Christian bookstore saying a special order she had placed had arrived—Bibles. My children will never know her. I can’t see any good in her death. Why would God take her? I still don’t know. Only God knows.

Yes, submitting to the sovereignty of God will can be bitter. Matthew tells us, “Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from the will of your Father.” I don’t have the desire or the theological training to discuss whether he wills or simply allows the sparrow to fall, or the faithful man or my mother-in-law to die, but I know He is sovereign.

Bezalel’s grandfather told him, “You can trust God, or you can be blown about like a leaf in the wind.” Without faith in our heavenly Father, life will knock you down, take you out, and eventually destroy you. Or you can cling to the Rock. Even when you just can’t understand, when you feel overwhelmed, God will hold you close. Say to Him, “You are my hiding place; you will protect me from trouble and surround me with songs of deliverance.” He will. In the midst of all the uncertainty and anguish, I promise He will.

CAROLE TOWRISS grew up in beautiful San Diego, California. Now she and her husband live just north of Washington, DC. In between making tacos and telling her four children to pick up their shoes for the third time, she reads, watches chick flicks, writes and waits for summertime to return to the beach. Her first novel, In the Shadow of Sinai, released November 1. You can find her at www.CaroleTowriss.com

Live light in 25 words – update

by Narelle Atkins

During the month of October on our 30 Minute Bible Studies Facebook Page we have participated in Bible Society Australia’s ‘Live light in 25 words’ challenge. The goal is to read 25 words or more every day in October to establish a regular Bible reading habit. If you’ve been following our progress on our Facebook page, you’ll know we’re reading the whole Gospel of Matthew in October.

Today we are reading Matthew 24:29-51.

No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father. (Matthew 24:29)

The first verse in this passage sets the scene for Jesus’ illustration of our need to be aware that He could return at any time, with no warning. This leads us to a challenging question: How we can live in a way that ensures we are prepared for Jesus’ return, which may or may not happen during our lifetime?

Having a missionary heart

by Narelle Atkins

He said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation.” (Mark 16:15)

According to the Gospel of Mark, this is one of the last things Jesus said to His disciples before He ascended into heaven. The Gospel of Matthew also records The Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-20).

We are commanded by Jesus to preach the gospel to the whole world and share the good news about Jesus bringing salvation to the world through His death and resurrection. This was a new way of thinking for the disciples. They understood that the Israelites were God’s chosen people and the focus in the Scriptures (Old Testament) had been on God working out His purposes and plan for salvation through His covenant with Abraham and his descendents.

The ministry to the Gentiles (non-Jews) really kicked off after Jesus ascended into heaven. The early missionary activities of the apostles are recorded in the book of Acts. In Acts we learn about Paul’s mission to preach the gospel to the Gentiles.

When I was younger I remember being quite intimidated by The Great Commission. How did this command impact the decisions I made? Did this mean I should dedicate my life to doing God’s work? And what would this look like? I had not felt called to be a missionary overseas or work for a Christian organisation. Was I selfish for wanting to live a so-called normal life as a wife and mother or should I have higher aspirations?

God created us with unique talents and abilities that we can use to bring Him glory. The body of Christ is made up of diverse people who work together to enable the gospel to be preached to all nations.

Whether we are serving on the front line as a missionary or playing a supporting role behind the scenes, we can all help in some way to reach people with the gospel message. And we can build relationships with those around us in our own mission field at home.

I can now see how my ‘missionary heart’ is revealed in many ways, including Bible studies, blogging and my Christian fiction writing. How is your ‘missionary heart’ revealed? What can you do to further the work of the gospel in our world?

The race for an eternal prize

by Narelle Atkins

On Monday this week, talk in the Australian media included commentaries discussing why the Australian Olympic team had only won 1 gold medal. (They have won 12 silver and 7 bronze). The Aussies won 14 gold in 2008 and 17 gold in 2004. Expectations are high that the Aussie team will bring home a large number of gold medals.

Aussie swimmer James Magnuson came one hundredth of a second away from winning gold in the Mens 100m freestyle swimming final. Heartbreakingly close to a gold medal but not close enough. Winning an Olympic silver medal is an outstanding achievement and I offer my congratulations to all the competitors who have given their best and won medals at the London Games.

Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians in Greece was written around 55 A.D. Chapter nine includes a sporting analogy the people of Corinth could identify with because their cultural heritage included the Ancient Olympic Games. The Ancient Olympics were believed to have been held for the first time in 776 BC and continued for centuries before being abolished in 393 A.D. by Emperor Theodosius who banned pagan cults. The Ancient Olympics were linked to religious festivals for the Greek god Zeus, the ruler of Olympus.

1 Corinthians 9:24-27: Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last; but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like a man running aimlessly; I do not fight like a man beating the air. No, I beat my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.  

Paul uses the analogy of a runner to explain self discipline in the Christian life. Althletes undergo years of rigorous training to prepare for the Olympic Games. They make sacrifices in order to focus on achieving their Olympic dream. And unless there is a tie, only one winner will receive the prized gold medal. Four years later athletes will compete in a new race for gold. New champions will arise and previous world records will be broken as athletes strive for excellence in their chosen sport.

Paul encourages us to have purpose in the way we live our life and to look forward to receiving the prize of eternal life. There is no heartbreaking second place because we all have the opportunity to receive the eternal prize. But Paul does caution us to be aware that we can disqualify ourselves if we don’t run the race to the end and have faith in Jesus Christ as our Lord and Saviour. Will you finish the race and receive the crown that will last forever?

Who will win the crown?

by Narelle Atkins

I’m a tennis fan and I’ve been following Wimbledon. Due to the time differences between Australia and the UK, I haven’t been able to stay up late and watch many matches. I woke on Tuesday morning to learn that the top seeded ladies player, Maria Sharapova, had been knocked out overnight and I was happy to hear my one of my favourite players, Roger Federer, had won his fourth round match.

Since the number two seeded player, Rafael Nadal, was defeated in the men’s second round, I’m wondering who will make it through to the singles final of both the men and women’s tournaments. This year the finals will not be a battle between the world’s number one and number two players, who are statistically the most likely players to reach the final. Who will finish the race and claim the Wimbledon crown?

In 2 Timothy 4 the apostle Paul writes to Timothy, knowing the end of his life is near.

2 Timothy 4:7-8: I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that day – and not only me, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.

Paul uses the analogy of an athlete when he considers his Christian journey. Unlike the tennis players who strive to win the Grand Slam, Paul’s mission was to spread the gospel to the Gentiles and bring people to Christ. Paul defended the Christian faith and stood firm despite fierce opposition and stints in jail. He was martyred for his faith not long after writing his second letter to Timothy.

At Wimbledon there can only be one winner in each of the tournaments who will be crowned the champion. Paul uses a sporting metaphor and tells us there is a ‘crown of righteousness’ waiting for him and those of us who finish the race and keep the faith. We have this to look forward to as we struggle like Paul to fight the good fight. Will you be awarded a crown of righteousness on the day when Christ returns?